Smoke alarm and Carbon Monoxide


​Smoke alarms are a key part of a home fire escape plan. When there is a fire, smoke spread fast. Working smoke alarms give you early warning so you can get outside quickly.


SAFETY TIPS

  • Install smoke alarms inside and outside each bedroom and sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Install alarms in the basement.
  • Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.
  • It is best to use interconnected smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sound they all sound. 
  • Test all smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working.
  • There are two kinds of alarms. ionization smoke alarms are quicker to warn about flaming fires. Photoelectric alarms are quicker to warn about smoldering fires. It is best to use both types of alarm in the home. 
  • People who are hard-of-hearing or deaf can use special alarms. These alarms have strobe lights and bed shakers.
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old. 


FACT- Roughly 3 out of 5 fire deaths happen in homes with no smoke alarms or the alarms are not working. 



When To Call 911

In an emergency, dial 911 or your local emergency number immediately.
An emergency is any situation that requires immediate assistance from the police, fire department or ambulance.

Examples include:
• A fire
• A crime, especially if in progress
• A car crash, especially if someone is injured
• A medical emergency, especially symptoms that    require immediate medical attention
Important: If you're not sure whether the situation is a true emergency, officials recommend calling 911 and letting the call-taker determine whether you need emergency help.


When you call 911, be prepared to answer the call-taker's questions, which may include:

• The location of the emergency, including the street address

• The phone number you are calling from
• The nature of the emergency
• Details about the emergency, such as a physical description of a person who may have committed a crime, a description of any fire that may be burning, or a description of injuries or symptoms being experienced by a person having a medical emergency

Remember, the call-taker's questions are important to get the right kind of help to you quickly. Be prepared to follow any instructions the call-taker gives you. Many 911 centers can tell you exactly what to do until help arrives, such as providing step-by-step instructions to aid someone who is choking or needs first aid or CPR. Do not hang up until the call-taker instructs you to.
If you dial 911 by mistake, or if a child in your home dials 911 when no emergency exists, do not hang up—that could make 911 officials think that an emergency exists, and possibly send responders to your location. Instead, simply explain to the call-taker what happened.

Safety Videos in Sign Language 


Byram Volunteer Fire Department

Greenwich, Connecticut

Want to read more about fire tips? Click on any of the buttons below. You can also print these documents and share with family and friends. 

you can also visit: www.nfpa.org



We want you to be safe, so take a look at some the Fire Safety Type with your family. Remember safety begins at home!